High-risk pregnancy

By , 17 December 2013

High-risk pregnancy

 

What is a high-risk pregnancy?

A high-risk or complicated pregnancy simply means a pregnancy that may be more likely than others to experience problems.  Importantly, it certainly does not mean that problems are expected; rather, that extra care and vigilance needs to be taken to be sure all risk factors are anticipated, identified, and minimised, to maximise a woman's chance of an uncomplicated pregnancy and delivery.
 

What makes a pregnancy high-risk?

Risk factors may result from conditions affecting the mother, such as high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease, or being overweight or underweight.  They may be based on previous pregnancy complications, such as a history of preterm birth or heavy bleeding after delivery.  Finally, risk factors may relate to the pregnancy itself, such as when a mother is expecting twins.  Sometimes risk factors aren't apparent at the start of a pregnancy, but develop during the course of pregnancy, such as gestational diabetes, blood pressure disorders, or growth problems with baby.
 

How are high-risk pregnancies managed?

High-risk pregnancies are best managed by a specialist.  Each pregnancy is unique, and no single approach suits all women.  If your pregnancy is high-risk, my approach is first to determine and rationalise any risk factors, both at your initial visit and during subsequent consultations.  Risk factors may have implications for you, your baby, or both.  I will discuss these implications with you, to tailor and plan appropriate management for you during your pregnancy, delivery, and after the birth of your baby.  My practice philosophy places great importance on the education and involvement of my patients in their management, to empower my patients to contribute to an informed decision-making process, whilst also providing leadership and clear recommendations, where appropriate.  Where necessary, collaboration with additional specialists is arranged, such as a Physician or Neonatologist (baby specialist). 
 

David practices evidence-based medicine, and strives to ensure all conditions that may complicate a pregnancy are managed according to the best available medical literature and published guidelines.

 

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High-risk pregnancy
 

About Dr David Moore

High-risk pregnancy

David is a Fellow of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, and undertook his specialist training in Queensland.  He is highly skilled in the management of complex and high-risk pregnancies, and has special training in minimally-invasive surgery, endometriosis, pelvic floor and incontinence surgery.  David has completed a Master of Reproductive Medicine and is skilled in the assessment and management of fertility problems, and can offer the full range of assisted reproductive treatments.  He is a Senior Lecturer with The University of Queensland Medical School, and has published both medical journal and textbook contributions.

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